Real Life Solutions

Subscribe

Archive for August, 2012

Keeping Your Kids Safe at School

August 28, 2012 By: RealLifeSolutions Category: Children, Healthy Living, Teenagers No Comments →

Now that the school year is up and in full swing, it is important that all parents use measures that result in keeping your kids safe at school.
(ARA) – The start of the school year is a time of great anticipation for parents and kids alike. New teachers. New classes. New and old friends. It’s a time for fun and learning.

Parents expect schools to be safe havens, but the reality is that children face a host of dangers all day long. Bullying, taunting and teasing are only some of the hazards that kids must deal with it every day at even the best schools in America.

About 30 percent of middle and high school students say they’ve been bullied. Among high school students, one out of nine teens reported they had been pushed, shoved, tripped or spit upon during the last school year, according to a National Institute of Child Health and Human Development research study.

FindLaw.com, the nation’s leading website for free legal information, offers the following tips on keeping your kids safe at school:

* Talk to your kids about school safety. Talk about bullying and make sure your child understands what is and is not acceptable behavior. Also discuss when and how to report bullying.

* Go to the bus stop. If your schedule allows, go to the bus stop with your child and get to know the other kids and parents, along with the bus driver.

* Get to know your kids’ teachers. Send your child’s teacher an email to introduce yourself and regularly check in on your child’s academic and social progress. Learn how his or her teacher approaches bullying and other issues that may distract from the school’s learning environment, such as the use of cell phones and iPods.

* Read the school’s policy on bullying.  Become familiar with school policies about bullying – particularly the protocols for identifying and reporting bullying behavior. Pay careful attention to policies regarding cyberbullying, which can take place outside of school.

Download your Free Parent Guide To Battling The Bullying Epidemic

* Watch and listen for the cues. Many kids don’t want to reveal to their parents that they’re being bullied, taunted or teased by other kids. If your child is withdrawn, not doing homework, sick more often than normal or demonstrating other out-of-the-ordinary behavior, talk about what seems to be bothering him or her.

* Know where your kids are at. Sometimes bullying and other unsafe situations take place outside of school grounds, such as at other students’ houses. Telling your kids that you want to know where they are and that they need permission to visit a friend’s house shows them you care. It also reassures them that they can contact you if they need help.

* Monitor Internet use and texting. Put the home computer in a public place and don’t allow your kids to use a computer in their bedroom by themselves.

* Talk to other parents. You may learn that their children also have been bullied or have been involved in activities on and off school grounds that you should be concerned about. You stand a much better chance of obtaining changes and creating a safer environment for your student by acting together rather than alone.

* Put it in writing. If you suspect your child is being bullied or sexually harassed by another student (or a teacher or staff member), ask for a face-to-face meeting with the school’s principal. If the principal does not act, hire an attorney and escalate your complaint to the superintendent and school board. Putting your complaint in writing about the specific types of negative behavior affecting your child is necessary if you need to litigate the complaint in court.

* Take appropriate action when bullying becomes assault. If your child is physically assaulted on the bus, in school or on school grounds, contact the local police department, particularly if there is a school liaison officer assigned to the school, about whether a police report or assault charges should be filed. Do not wait to let the school handle the situation.

For more information on keeping your kids safe at school, visit FindLaw.com.  Also be sure to Download your Free Parent Guide To Battling The Bullying Epidemic

 

Energy Boosting Breakfast Ideas for Students

August 10, 2012 By: RealLifeSolutions Category: Freebies, Healthy Living, Parenting No Comments →

Running late for school yet again?  Just give the kids a Pop Tart on the way out the door and they’ll be fine.  If you’re all out of the sugary toaster treat, just swing through Krispy Kreme on the way and your offspring will be good to go.  Right?  Wrong! Wrong! And Wrong.  You might as well give your children a cup of coffee if that’s what you consider a good breakfast.

Well sure it’s quick, convenient and tasty!  In addition to lacking any nutritional value, the sugar buzz will quickly wear off and then your little one will fall asleep right before morning recess.   So what about a bowl of cereal and a bagel?  Nope, that’s not much better; although some cold cereals are clearly better than others. You want to feed your children a nutritionally sound breakfast, complete with a source of protein.

Quick and convenient does not have to equate to a boatload of carbs and sugar.  How many times have you heard, “breakfast is the most important meal of the day”?  It’s true; it sets the tone for the whole day.  Children need to be able to focus, and they need to be awake.

Eggs are a great source of protein.  If you don’t have time to cook in the morning, then make some hard boiled eggs the night before.  Those are quick and easy.  You can also make fruit smoothies with yogurt and your children’s favorite fruit.  Add a little cinnamon and vanilla, and then pour it all in the blender.

How many years has Carnation Instant Breakfast been around?  It’s been around longer than most readers will remember.  But there is good reason for their longevity.  It’s chock full of antioxidants (as much as a cup of green tea) and it has twice the protein of an egg and twice as much calcium as a 6 oz. container of fruited yogurt.  It tastes like chocolate milk, but it’s oh so much better.

Maybe your child just isn’t a breakfast person.  Who says you have to eat typical breakfast food in the morning?  Have you read “101 Delicious Chicken Recipes?” If your student likes chicken, serve up a 3 oz. chicken breast for breakfast.  There’s no rule against it.  And it’s a nutritionally sound breakfast, complete with a source of protein.

Don’t forget to put a small baggie full of almonds in your child’s backpack. Nuts are also a great convenient, energy boosting addition to breakfast.  Just say ‘No” to sugary toaster treats!